Searcher
Agustín García
Agustín García
Principal Economist
Spain

Agustín García Serrador joined the Europe Unit of BBVA Research in June 2008. Currently, he is the Head Economist in the Global Economic Scenarios Unit where he handles macroeconomic analysis of the eurozone as a whole, as well as of its main members and the United Kingdom. He also helps analyse the main factors and consistency of the global situation.


Previously, he was the macroeconomic coordinator of BIAM at the Flores de Lemus Institute in Carlos III University in Madrid as well as a professor of Macroeconometrics and Applied Economy at CEU San Pablo University. He also taught master’s programmes in both of these universities.


Macroeconometrics and monetary and tax policy research in the eurozone with publications in Applied Economics, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics and Journal of Forecasting.


He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Economy and won a National Award for Excellence in Academic Performance in 2002, and he earned a Diploma for Advanced Studies from CEU San Pablo University, for which he also received the 2004 Youth Prize from the Complutense University of Madrid.

Latest publications

Global growth will continue to decelerate in 3Q19, as higher trade protectionism and uncertainty keep having a negative impact on global activity. Countercyclical policies, led by central banks, help to mitigate negative effects, but they will not prevent the global economy from slowing more than expected three months ago.
In a relatively relaxed press conference- Draghi’s last one as ECB President- , he provided a dovish tone, in line with his entire presidency. He did not give any hints about action to be taken in the short term, trying not to tie the hands of his successor, Mrs Lagarde. We expect the ECB to remain on hold.
More evident negative effects of worsening global demand and uncertainty on exports and investment explain the downward revision of growth in 2020. Further monetary easing and slightly expansive fiscal policy could help to halt deteriorating confidence and to underpin spending, with increasing divergence across countries.