Searcher
Sumedh Deorukhkar
Sumedh Deorukhkar
Senior Economist
Madrid

Sumedh Deorukhkar joined BBVA Research in 2011. Starting 2019, he has been working as a Senior Economist in the Economic and Financial Forecasting Unit, based in Madrid. His key areas of responsibility include analysis of global portfolio flows and macroeconomic scenarios.

In his prior capacity as Senior Economist Asia, based in Hong Kong and Mumbai, he contributed to a variety of economic research reports on China, India, & ASEAN. He also worked closely with BBVA’s fixed income sales team to provide macroeconomic perspectives to BBVA’s clients across the region, which included several Asian Central Banks. He was also responsible for providing strategic insights to BBVA’s management on Fintech potential in Asia.

In previous years, Sumedh worked with ICICI Bank, India’s largest private sector bank, as an economist in its Treasury department, where he published extensively on the US economy and global financial markets.

Sumedh regularly shares economic views across electronic media and his work is quoted in leading business newspapers and magazines. He holds an MSc degree in Economics from Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, an advanced research institute established by the Reserve Bank of India. He also holds a specialized degree in Financial Risk Management from the Global Association of Risk Professionals (GARP), USA.

Latest publications

Today’s policy meeting saw the ECB leave its rates unchanged while maintaining the current pace of PEPP purchases, but delivered a moderately positive assessment of the evolving economic situation. This despite an acknowledgement of the underlying uncertainties posed by the pandemic
The ECB reaffirmed the assessment for the Euro Area macro-economic outlook put forth in March's meeting. The ECB left monetary policy as well as forward guidance unchanged, with President Lagarde striking a note of cautious optimism over the medium term outlook while being cognizant of near term downside risks.
International trade will slow down by 2030, due to both traditional factors (technology, economic development, trade policies) and new determinants (COVID-19, sustainability).